Soda associated with accelerated aging

15476555_sSugar-sweetened beverages, including soft drinks or sodas, fruit-flavored drinks, sports drinks, and energy drinks, are the largest source of added sugar in the US diet.  In a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health, researchers found sugar-sweetened soda consumption was associated with shorter telomeres.  This may be significant because shorter telomeres are associated with shorter lives.  Accumulated data support the notion that the loss of telomeres contributes to human aging.   Inside our cells, our genes are arranged along molecules of DNA called chromosomes. At the ends of the chromosomes are stretches of DNA called telomeres, which protect our genetic data and make it possible for cells to divide.  “Telomeres have been compared with the plastic tips on shoelaces, because they keep chromosome ends from fraying and sticking to each other, which would destroy or scramble an organism’s genetic information. Yet, each time a cell divides, the telomeres get shorter. When they get too short, the cell can no longer divide; it becomes inactive or “senescent” or it dies. This shortening process is associated with aging, cancer, and a higher risk of death. So telomeres also have been compared with a bomb fuse.”

Bottom line: There is sufficient evidence to limit our consumption of all sugar sweetened beverages to improve cardiometabolic risk factors, reduce chronic disease risk, and improve overall health.

By |2014-11-05T19:41:33-04:00November 5th, 2014|Categories: Nutrition, Seniors|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

About the Author:

Dean Smith, DC, PhD, husband, and father of two children, is a highly respected health and wellness authority. He is a chiropractor at Essence of Wellness Chiropractic Center and a researcher and clinical professor at Miami University. Dr. Smith incorporates lifestyle intervention (exercise, nutrition, other non-drug methods) with chiropractic adjustments and other manual methods to encourage optimal wellness. He has helped countless adults and children lead a life of wellness. His research interests lie broadly in the area of human movement and coordination. He is most interested in how chiropractic, exercise and rehabilitation affect human performance. His scientific articles have been published in such journals as Human Movement Science, Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Chiropractic Research Journal, Chiropractic and Osteopathy and The Open Neurology Journal. His training includes a Master’s degree in exercise science, a Doctor of Chiropractic degree and a PhD in brain and cognitive science with a focus on motor control and coordination. The International Federation of Sports Chiropractic has awarded him with the International Chiropractic Sport Science Diploma (ICSSD).

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