Exercise for the Prevention of Low Back Pain

Exercise alone has been shown to reduce the risk of low back pain (LBP) by 33% and exercise combined with education by 27% says a new review study. The severity of LBP and disability from LBP were also lower in the exercise groups compared to control groups.  Interestingly, the results were not changed by excluding the non-randomized controlled trials, or by adjustment for publication bias. Few trials assessed healthcare consultation or sick leave for LBP.  Additionally, meta-analyses did not show statistically significant protective effects of exercise on those outcomes. Exercise reduces the risk of LBP and associated disability.
The bottom line recommendation from the article is:
* A combination of strengthening with either stretching or aerobic exercises performed 2–3 times/week can reasonably be recommended for prevention of low back pain in the general population.
By | 2017-10-21T13:55:00+00:00 October 21st, 2017|Categories: Exercise|Tags: , , |0 Comments

About the Author:

Dean Smith, DC, PhD, husband, and father of two children, is a highly respected health and wellness authority. He is a chiropractor at Essence of Wellness Chiropractic Center and a researcher and clinical professor at Miami University.

Dr. Smith incorporates lifestyle intervention (exercise, nutrition, other non-drug methods) with chiropractic adjustments and other manual methods to encourage optimal wellness. He has helped countless adults and children lead a life of wellness.

His research interests lie broadly in the area of human movement and coordination. He is most interested in how chiropractic, exercise and rehabilitation affect human performance.

His scientific articles have been published in such journals as Human Movement Science, Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Chiropractic Research Journal, Chiropractic and Osteopathy and The Open Neurology Journal. His training includes a Master’s degree in exercise science, a Doctor of Chiropractic degree and a PhD in brain and cognitive science with a focus on motor control and coordination. The International Federation of Sports Chiropractic has awarded him with the International Chiropractic Sport Science Diploma (ICSSD).

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