Massage Therapy in Children with Asthma

massage, asthmaAccording to a new scientific review, from Chinese authors, massage therapy can help asthma and significantly improve pulmonary function in children. The authors of the study evaluated the efficacy of massage, a traditional treatment method of traditional Chinese medicine on children with asthma.  Fourteen studies with 1299 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with the control group, a better efficacy was found in treatment group, which focused on massage therapy. Compared with control group, there was remarkable increase on FEV1 as well as PEF in the treatment group. The results found all studies have shown that massage therapy has a significantly positive effect on children with asthma, improves the pulmonary function parameters of large airways, reduces the plasma concentrations of PAF and prostaglandin, and increases the levels of PAF-AH and DP1; therefore, it greatly improves pulmonary function.  However, the limited research designs of the included studies lead to high risk of bias. More randomized controlled trials with better methodological quality are needed to further confirm the effectiveness of massage.

 

By | 2017-06-18T21:25:38+00:00 June 18th, 2017|Categories: Children, Massage Therapy|Tags: , , |0 Comments

About the Author:

Dean Smith, DC, PhD, husband, and father of two children, is a highly respected health and wellness authority. He is a chiropractor at Essence of Wellness Chiropractic Center and a researcher and clinical professor at Miami University. Dr. Smith incorporates lifestyle intervention (exercise, nutrition, other non-drug methods) with chiropractic adjustments and other manual methods to encourage optimal wellness. He has helped countless adults and children lead a life of wellness. His research interests lie broadly in the area of human movement and coordination. He is most interested in how chiropractic, exercise and rehabilitation affect human performance. His scientific articles have been published in such journals as Human Movement Science, Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Chiropractic Research Journal, Chiropractic and Osteopathy and The Open Neurology Journal. His training includes a Master’s degree in exercise science, a Doctor of Chiropractic degree and a PhD in brain and cognitive science with a focus on motor control and coordination. The International Federation of Sports Chiropractic has awarded him with the International Chiropractic Sport Science Diploma (ICSSD).

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