Fruits for Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death worldwide. Diet comprises a mixture of food compounds that have a significant influence on human health. Accumulating population based studies have indicated that consuming fruits is inversely related to the risk of CVDs.  Important experimental studies have supported the protective role of fruits against CVDs, and several fruits (grape, blueberry, pomegranate, apple, hawthorn, and avocado) have been widely studied and have shown potent cardiovascular protective action. Fruits can prevent CVDs or facilitate the restoration of the structure and functions of heart and vessels after injury. It is likely that fruits act by protecting the lining of your blood vessels, regulating fat metabolism, modulating blood pressure, inhibiting platelet function, alleviating certain types of injury, suppressing blot formation, reducing oxidative stress, and reducing inflammation.  A review in the journal Nutrients, finds that several fruits can influence metabolic risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and overweight/obesity, and inhibit atherosclerosis, which is the key pathological process of coronary heart disease and stroke.

Reference: Zhao CN, Meng X, Li Y, Li S, Liu Q, Tang GY, Li HB. Fruits for Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases. Nutrients. 2017 Jun 13;9(6).

By | 2017-06-23T09:07:10+00:00 June 23rd, 2017|Categories: Nutrition|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

About the Author:

Dean Smith, DC, PhD, husband, and father of two children, is a highly respected health and wellness authority. He is a chiropractor at Essence of Wellness Chiropractic Center and a researcher and clinical professor at Miami University. Dr. Smith incorporates lifestyle intervention (exercise, nutrition, other non-drug methods) with chiropractic adjustments and other manual methods to encourage optimal wellness. He has helped countless adults and children lead a life of wellness. His research interests lie broadly in the area of human movement and coordination. He is most interested in how chiropractic, exercise and rehabilitation affect human performance. His scientific articles have been published in such journals as Human Movement Science, Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Chiropractic Research Journal, Chiropractic and Osteopathy and The Open Neurology Journal. His training includes a Master’s degree in exercise science, a Doctor of Chiropractic degree and a PhD in brain and cognitive science with a focus on motor control and coordination. The International Federation of Sports Chiropractic has awarded him with the International Chiropractic Sport Science Diploma (ICSSD).

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