High Carbohydrate Intake Associated with Higher Death Risk

A study published a few days ago in the Lancet found that high carbohydrate intake was associated with higher risk of total mortality, fats including saturated and unsaturated fatty acids were associated with lower risk of total mortality and stroke.  The authors note that current guidelines recommend a low fat diet (<30% of energy) and limiting saturated fatty acids to less than 10% of energy intake by replacing them with unsaturated fatty acids. These guidelines are based on findings from some North American and European countries where nutrition excess is of concern. However, these latest study findings are in contrast to dietary guidelines, where fats, including saturated fatty acids, are not harmful and diets high in carbohydrate have adverse effects on total mortality.

Reference:

Dehghan M et al. Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study investigators. Associations of fats and carbohydrate intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 18 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study. Lancet. 2017 Aug 28. pii: S0140-6736(17)32252-3.

By | 2017-09-03T17:28:32+00:00 September 3rd, 2017|Categories: Nutrition|Tags: , , |0 Comments

About the Author:

Dean Smith, DC, PhD, husband, and father of two children, is a highly respected health and wellness authority. He is a chiropractor at Essence of Wellness Chiropractic Center and a researcher and clinical professor at Miami University. Dr. Smith incorporates lifestyle intervention (exercise, nutrition, other non-drug methods) with chiropractic adjustments and other manual methods to encourage optimal wellness. He has helped countless adults and children lead a life of wellness. His research interests lie broadly in the area of human movement and coordination. He is most interested in how chiropractic, exercise and rehabilitation affect human performance. His scientific articles have been published in such journals as Human Movement Science, Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Chiropractic Research Journal, Chiropractic and Osteopathy and The Open Neurology Journal. His training includes a Master’s degree in exercise science, a Doctor of Chiropractic degree and a PhD in brain and cognitive science with a focus on motor control and coordination. The International Federation of Sports Chiropractic has awarded him with the International Chiropractic Sport Science Diploma (ICSSD).

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