Treating Diabetes with Exercise

2761421_sExercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, particularly as part of disease prevention rather than cure.  Lifestyle interventions including diet and exercise are the first line of  defense against issues like diabetes, and the associated metabolic diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease and hypertension.  The benefits are typically thought of in terms of weight loss, improved body composition and reduced fat mass, however, exercise can have many other beneficial effects. Exercise can affect the blood vessels, improving endothelial health. Further, insulin sensitivity is improved, and the treatment of endothelial dysfunction may also reduce complications associated with both diabetes and other metabolic disease. While the use of drugs to improve microvascular function in diabetes has is common, exercise can also provide many of the same benefits on endothelial function, and should remain an early intervention and the first prescription in combination with diet when treating insulin resistance and diabetes.

By |2014-05-02T11:59:10-04:00May 2nd, 2014|Categories: Exercise, Nutrition|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

About the Author:

Dean Smith, DC, PhD, husband, and father of two children, is a highly respected health and wellness authority. He is a chiropractor at Essence of Wellness Chiropractic Center and a researcher and clinical professor at Miami University. Dr. Smith incorporates lifestyle intervention (exercise, nutrition, other non-drug methods) with chiropractic adjustments and other manual methods to encourage optimal wellness. He has helped countless adults and children lead a life of wellness. His research interests lie broadly in the area of human movement and coordination. He is most interested in how chiropractic, exercise and rehabilitation affect human performance. His scientific articles have been published in such journals as Human Movement Science, Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Chiropractic Research Journal, Chiropractic and Osteopathy and The Open Neurology Journal. His training includes a Master’s degree in exercise science, a Doctor of Chiropractic degree and a PhD in brain and cognitive science with a focus on motor control and coordination. The International Federation of Sports Chiropractic has awarded him with the International Chiropractic Sport Science Diploma (ICSSD).

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